Categorized | Acne

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Genital Warts – How To Tell If The Bumps On The Vagina, Penis Or Anus Are STD Warts

Think you have genital warts and wondering why you of all people have them. Genital warts is the most common viral sexually transmitted infection caused by the human papilloma virus. The disease is passed on through “sexual contact” so it’s clear your warts have likely developed as a result of sexual activity with an infected person. You can scream all you want calling this person every name under the sun, but the damage is done, so lets not waste time planning revenge, lets focus on treating the warts. Not everyone will develop genital warts, and fortunately for most, including those who have visible warts, the virus usually clears from the body over time.

If you’ve noticed warts round the vagina or penis, but not sure they are what you think they are, then get what you think you see determined by your GP. Okay, it is embarrassing having to tell someone, especially when you think about how the warts got there and the place their located, but hey, genital problems of this nature are common, and not something new to the doctor.

You’re not likely to die, or neither be left treating a long-term health problem after suffering an episode of genital warts. There is more information on how to treat your own warts effectively to be rid of them at the bottom of the page.

How are genital warts passed on

The virus is passed from person to person through sexual contact, and affects both genders.

Vaginal or anal sex is a common way the warts are passed on.

The penis doesn’t even have to enter the vagina for the virus to take hold and spread.

Can the virus pass through a condom, yes and no. Maybe not through the condom, but because they don’t cover the whole genital area its possible, and there’s also the possibility of the condom splitting putting you at risk.

The virus can be passed on even though the warts have disappeared.

It’s seldom you’ll hear of them developing in the mouth or throat, or on the lips from oral sex, but be wary – leave nothing to chance.

Is it possible for the expectant woman to pass the virus on to her baby during delivery, yes, but not common..

Don’t go panicking cleaning everything in sight. Warts don’t come via lavatory seats, towels, or eating utensils. And neither, from using a communal swimming pool or kissing and cuddling.

About genital warts and symptoms

It’s important you’re aware of the symptoms to help rule out genital acne of some other sort, whether it harmless or serious. It’s a dodgy predicament to be in when it comes to having sex with an infected person because, not everyone with HPV get visible warts, so no clear sign of infection being present.

Female – warts can develop inside the vagina, upper thighs, and on, or inside the bottom. Other areas – the vulva (the lips around the opening to the vagina) and cervix (entrance to the uterus).

The penis, scrotum, urethra (tube where urine is released) and the upper thighs, and on, or inside the bum are typical places for men.

They can be difficult to detect. Some are so small making them hard to spot.

Genital warts can look flat or appear as smooth small bumps, or, like big pinkish cauliflower florets.

They can come single or in clusters.

They’re not known for causing pain, nonetheless, itch and inflammation can be a problem.

Warts can cause bleeding from the anus or urethra.

If flow of wee is all over the show, it could be a sign of warts in the urethra.

It’s natural to be worried when something your not familiar with happens to your body, but nevertheless have the warts checked out. Don’t be put off going to the doctor fearing the worst about what he/she will do, or what the treatment includes, as there is not much to it.

The check up

It may be necessary for a magnifying lens to be used to look at the warts.

The GP might arrange for an internal examination of the vagina or anus.

Not often but there may be call for a small sample (biopsy) of the wart.

Local anaesthetic might be used depending on the area the warts are located.

Usual practice for detecting most infections is by a blood sample, but genital warts is something there is no blood test for.

Don’t want to consult the family doctor, that’s fine, pick another source for help. Call your local genitourinary medicine (GUM) or sexual health clinic, or you could try a contraception clinic.

Although pictures may show what genital warts look like, still be cautious and have someone in the know verify the condition. It’s easy to get confused, and confusion is something that can hamper the way you treat the warts, that is, if they are warts, and not acne pimples or boils.

Treatments

If warts can been seen then you’ll be given treatment. Medication can vary due to the area the warts are sited, their size, and how many. In most cases, treatment is effective, but again, the size and type of wart will determine success, and how strong your immune system is. Antibiotics will not clear the infection because bacteria is not the cause.

There are creams and liquids specially designed for this. Some may need to be applied to the warts for several weeks. Other treatments – Freezing (cryotherapy) – Heat (electrocautery), using local anaesthetic – Surgery, using local anaesthetic. – Laser treatment, using local anaesthetic.

Warts can return, but there’s no proof they’re a result of the original infection or a new infection from a partner. If you take necessary precautions to stay safe, then you have the answer – the original infection is back.

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